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Chicken, Sausage and Oyster Jambalaya · 17 July 2017 by colin newell

Oyster Chicken and Sausage Jambalaya

I have a weak spot for Cajun cooking and my occasional forays into this wonderful regional cuisine from Louisiana almost always includes variations on Gumbo or Jambalaya.

These dishes scale up nicely so if you have the pots and the ingredients, you can whip up double and triple batches and feed your entire neighbourhood!

Here is a spin on Jambalaya that borrows from a Creole gumbo recipe that I have kicking around.

For reference, here is my gumbo recipe and my other Oyster Jambalaya – Enjoy!

Meat
1 1/2 lbs Chicken breast cut into bit sized pieces.
12 oz hot Italian Sausage, Andouille or Chorizo – whatever is on hand

Produce
1 tsp Basil, dried
1 cup Bell pepper
1 cup Celery
2 cups Swiss chard – chiffonade
2 cloves Garlic
2 cup Onion
1 Parsley, Fresh
1 tsp Thyme, dried
1 14.5-oz can Tomatoes, with juice

Canned or prepped Goods
4 1/2 cup Chicken broth
1 6-oz can Tomato paste

Condiments
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce

Pasta & Grains
2 1/2 cup White Basmati rice

Baking & Spices
1/4 tsp Cayenne pepper
3/4 tsp Pepper
1 1/2 tsp Salt

Oils & Vinegars
2 tbsp Canola Oil

Instructions

In a large pot, or Dutch oven, add 1 tablespoon oil, the sausage, ½ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper. Cook for 15 minutes.
Remove sausage and place on platter – cut into bite size pieces when cool.

Add chicken to cooking pot and cook over medium heat for 8-10 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through. Season with salt and pepper.

Remove chicken from the pot and set aside.

Drizzle another tablespoon of Canola oil into the pot and then add onion, celery and bell pepper. Cook for 6-8 minutes, or until vegetables are almost tender or translucent. Add garlic and saute for an additional 2 minutes.

Place chicken and sausage back into the pot.

In a small bowl combine remaining 1 teaspoon salt, ½ tsp pepper, thyme, basil and cayenne pepper. Toss to combine.
Add seasoning mix, Worcestershire, tomato paste, and diced tomatoes to the meat and veg. Stir to combine.

Next, place rice and 4 ½ cup broth in the pot. Stir to completely combine. Over medium heat, wait for the ingredients to come to a boil. Reduce heat to low and let jambalaya simmer for 15 minutes. Added chopped oysters and Swiss chard. Simmer for another 10-15 minutes.

Check on the jambalaya at the 25-30 minute mark and see if it needs additional liquid. Stir occasionally to avoid burning on the bottom of the pot.

Once rice is completely cooked, serve immediately with fresh parsley and enjoy!

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2010 Chevy Cobalt for sale in Victoria · 13 July 2017 by colin newell

Car for sale Victoria Car for sale Victoria Car for sale Victoria Car for Sale Victoria Car for sale Victoria Car for sale Victoria

Just testing out some formatting things with multi-photo pages so I thought I would add some content that needed multi-photo coverage – with a complementary ad for a friend in my lab.

Click on any photo for the high resolution enlargement!

A friend and colleague is selling his car here in Victoria –
and it is a standard shift! :-)
2010 Chevy Cobalt, Standard, 107,000kms,
asking $4500.00
or Best Offer.
In great operating condition and clean.

This would be a great first car for your teenager or young adult heading out to University or College in the fall.

“Hi Everyone,
I need to sell my car if anyone is looking please contact me.
Details and pictures are below.

Thanks,
Mike Thomas
Audio Visual Technology Assistant
Audio Visual Services | University of Victoria
t. 250-721-8833
office: CLE 067

Extras about these cars – link
The Chevrolet Cobalt delivers inexpensive, high-value transportation.We find these cars enjoyable to drive and their attractive price and notable fuel economy makes for a compelling package with a lot of value. The Cobalt is quiet and refined for a small car and it delivers crisp handling and a smooth ride, all benefits of its strong, rigid platform.
The Chevrolet Cobalt comes in two-door coupe and four-door sedan body styles, and in base, LS, LT, and SS trim levels. The base engine produces 155 horsepower and qualifies the Cobalt as an Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle; these models come standard with a five-speed manual transmission and a four-speed automatic is an option. The base version of the Cobalt is EPA-rated at 25/37 mpg City/Highway with the five-speed manual transmission.

The Cobalt SS is powered by a turbocharged 2.0-liter four rated at 260 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. A heavy-duty five-speed manual is the only transmission available with the SS. The SS is available only as the coupe.

For 2010, Chevrolet Cobalt changes are few. The My Link package includes an AM/FM/CD/MP3/USB audio system with Bluetooth connectivity, cruise control, leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, steering-wheel audio controls, OnStar Directions and Connections, and 16-inch alloy wheels. The power sunroof and performance display are standard on the SS model.


You can e-mail Michael at [email protected] – .


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Reader's Digest Canada rant chapter two - seniors under siege · 27 June 2017 by colin newell

Canada Readers Digest Rant 2009 Seniors hassled

or click here for the mp3 if you cannot see the above widget.


This is a reboot of one of my favourite blogs (and rants) from gasp 2009! Enjoy.

I spoke with a rep from Canada Post today…
and he said (from his post office in the Oak Bay village)…

“We get 10 to 15 citizens that come into this little post office every day of business that are returning materials to Reader’s Digest!”

10 to 15 folks. Every day. Most of them seniors. From one Post Office!

I have been on the phone to Reader’s Digest canada twice in the last week and I get the following scripted dialogue from their service partners…

“It is not the policy of Reader’s Digest Canada to send people unsolicited materials or products.”

Okay then. What the heck is happening when 10 to 15 citizens are appearing at each Canadian post office daily?
Here is my theory.
Canadians, by the droves, are returning “pieces of mail from Reader’s Digest Canada” that, according to Reader’s Digest, are no-obligation entry forms for their $500,000 sweepstakes.

What our Canadian seniors are failing to do is read the fine print.

Because with every “win $500,000 now” sweepstakes shills is, very likely, a piece of fine print that states – in exchange for your no obligation entry into the Reader’s Digest $500,000 contest, you agree to purchase X quantity of books at market value.

Market value huh? I am looking at a $700 invoice for my dear old aunt. She has a stack of books on her Reader’s Digest mail strewn coffee table – that she claims that she did not order. So what happened? I suspect that she did not read the fine print… over and over and over again.

Today I returned a 4-CD set of elevator music to Reader’s Digest Canada that one could, arguably, buy at Shoppers Drug Mart for $22.
Reader’s Digest cost: $79

Is Reader’s Digest breaking any Canadian laws? In short, no.
Are they doing anything unethical? That is out there for debate.

I think we are going to be hearing way more about this Reader’s Digest Canada issue.

Because the bottom line, for me, is:
Protect our seniors from scam artists… whomever they might be.

Have a listen!

or click here for the mp3 if you cannot see the above widget.


Colin Newell gets mad when our elderly are exploited in any way. And when he gets angry, he gets blogging!

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And now a moment of shameless self promotion · 23 May 2017 by colin newell

The highlight of 2007, for me, was recording a CD worth of music… something I have always wanted to do. I grew up in a house that had a fair amount of music in it – A Heinztman piano from the 19th century was a household fixture and I started playing it when I was 6 or 7. After a couple of years worth of lessons, a guitar started to seem way cooler – and easier to pack around too. That was in the mid-Seventies.

Godin Jazz Guitars 2013

By the mid-eighties I was playing around with a small collection of garage and jukebox bands. In the late eighties, I had a hand in on producing a couple of small folk acts – one such project netted about 4000 units sold – which was not bad for a self-published recording completed on a budget less than $500 in a borrowed studio in a University radio station.

Fast forward to 2017 and I am working on a few musical things with a few people. Here is a snippet featuring Kala ukulele, Cort acoustic guitars, stand up bass, drums and Piano…

Track 1 – You can’t always get what you want –

Track 1 – If you cannot see the audio player above, click here for the mp3 download.

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Talking coffee health studies with Natasha Hall of NewsTalk 800 CJAD Montreal · 26 April 2017 by colin newell

Podcast – Talking coffee with Natasha Hall of CJAD 800 NewsTalk – Montreal –

CJAD 800 NewsTalk Montreal

We were talking coffee with Natasha Hall of NewsTak 800 – Montreal on the topic of those seemingly endless health studies on the dire (or wonderful) effects of caffeine and coffee (in general) on your body!

This podcast (interview) is around 14 minutes long – so strap yourself in.

I average around 20 radio, TV or newspaper interviews annually and this was one of the better ones – a lot of these radio hosts are affable, enthusiastic and well read before they undertake an interview – honored to chat on the subject of my passion. Coffee. Love it.

Podcast – If you cannot see the audio player above, click here for the mp3 download.

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