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The Nespresso Inissia pod system and the convenience of now · 4.08.15 by colin newell

The Nespresso Pod machine - how convenient

I get many offers of coffee machines to test in exchange for a review – or a machine in exchange from one of the many online companies offering a selection of coffee products.

The folks at New York City and Berlin based were good enough to send a very significant supply of coffee samples and arrange for an Inissia machine to test them on and for me to keep, cherish and redistribute however I saw fit. Great deal.

So – my review of the Innisia is over here – and it is worth a spin before proceeding with the rest of these follow up observations.

OK – here is the big upside of Nespresso pod coffee. It is convenient and fast. It reduces the planning for coffee to a push of a single button. Feel like coffee? Get out some pods and fill and power up the machine. There is little more than a minute and a half of waiting while the unit heats up. I like to heat up my cups before I start brewing shots from the Nespresso so that might take a few more moments of your time. So, if you are absolutely and positively in a hurry and have to have your coffee right now, this might be the way to go.

The quality of the Nespresso coffee pods is good, annoying good in some ways when you compare it to other methods of brewing. From a technical stand point, there is not quite enough coffee in each pod to balance the mount of water that the Nespresso pushes through. I noticed that the Gourmesso pods contained slightly less coffee (or the pods were a touch smaller) and the quality of the coffee was not quite up to the level of the Nespresso pods. The Gourmesso pods are also cheaper – and I think at last check, a Nespresso pod is well over a buck a pop. And for you convenience lovers, that adds up fast! We had some friends over last night for some wine and coffee (brewed on our patio out of doors!) and they claimed to be Nespresso lovers for a few months until the costs for the pods started to rack up.

They noted that they were averaging $200 (Canadian) a month on pods – they are both coffee drinkers. They were brewing several double shots in the morning and afternoon and quickly added up to lots of pods.
The Nespresso (and Gourmesso) pods are only available online (or in Nespresso boutique stores in large Urban cities) so the costs and shipping start to add up fast. My whole bean coffee habit when consuming the same amount of coffee (brewed as gravity drip) is less than 1/2 this amount and I serve an average of 2-4 cups a day to 2 to 4 people every day of the week!

The big downside outside of the cost of pods is the waste that is generated – but slowly there are recycling stations that are taking the spent pods – which often contain plastic, paper and foil in one unit — kind of difficult to process. Pod systems are quite the rage right now and the environment is having a bad time with all the waste materials and it could be years before the planet catches up to it all.

The Nespresso machines themselves tend to not be that expensive and they are not that complex – and they are wickedly convenient… but that comes with a cost that you have to weigh out. Do the math ahead of time and if you think you can live with the extra cost, then go ahead.

Personally, I like my gravity drip methods, my Hario filter holders, paper, grinder, kettle and scale. It’s hipster and tasty and easier on my pocket book and my conscience. For the Coffeecrew blog and website, I am Colin Newell in Victoria B.C. Canada.


Barista Bible author Cristine Cottrell on the subject of Aussie coffee · 14.07.15 by colin newell

Click here for audio file if you cannot see flash player above.

When I started writing about and reviewing coffee shops and cafe culture in the mid-1990’s I always dreamed of writing the ultimate coffee book or complete (as I saw it) history of coffee culture in North America. And although I have kept at a blog and a website on the subject of cafe culture for 20 years now, I have yet to write the book. And in my travels all those years I have met every manner of coffee expert and niche professional – you know, someone who knows espresso inside and out or someone who knows how to build a successful chain of coffee shops or someone who has invented an amazing brewing device or coffee gadget… but I have never met anyone who had that perfect grasp of the entire picture – you know, the person who could write such a book or guide.

Christine Cottrell of Perfect Espresso

Well when Christine Cottrell and her husband Paul came to town (after their tour of the Western states and a visit to SCAA 2015 in April) I thought to myself, OK, I am going to get to meet up with another of the industries leaders in one area or another of specialty coffee. Which in itself is awesome – but I was not expecting to meet that person that was actually creating that definitive guide to all things coffee!

And after a day with Christine and Paul, I had a new perspective and reinvigoration in my own coffee passion.

So, who is Christine Cottrell and what has she done? Well, Christine connects with baristas and coffee experts around the world finding out everything there is to know about global cafe and coffee culture and where the heck it is going.

With over 20 years of experience, herself, in teaching and working in the hospitality industry, Christine created The Coffee Education Network and has helped thousands up their game in specialty coffee with her complete series of training manuals and guides – the flagship being the Barista Bible.

It was in 2009 that the first 10 publications were made available to the Australian marketplace, and they were so warmly received that an international release took place in London, England in 2010 at an international coffee conference. Her guide, the Barista Bible is about simply everything coffee – but there is so much more to it. Her supplementary guides include troubleshooting for the cafe owner and barista, the dialog of the cafe, an up to date dictionary on 21st Centuries emerging coffee lexicon and a complete recipe or menu guide for the modern cafe.

Christine and her husband Paul are clearly on something of a global mission to educate consumers and raise cafe culture (through education and instilling passion in cafe owners) to an entirely new level.

Their motto appears to be “The pursuit of excellence” in Australia and their dedication to a better cup of coffee has, in no small part, pushed Australia to the leading edge in the global quest for cafe quality domination. It was an honour to spend a day with Christine and Paul and I make no bones about it – my own passion level in the World of specialty coffee needed an infusion – and it got one serious one indeed!

Christine’s work is available over on her website at


Grilled spicy Lamb burgers on the old Weber · 1.07.15 by colin newell

Grilled Lamb burgers on the old Weber

Andrea and I made these from fresh ground Island lamb and fresh herbs from the garden – much like regular beef burgers but with a kick – and they are lamb.

They are around 3/4” thick – I grilled them at around 375 to 425 for 5 minutes on the first side
and 2 minutes on the second side.


1½ pounds ground lamb
2 tablespoons tightly packed finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves
2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon moroccan spice mix
½ teaspoon ground coriander
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 garlic cloves, minced
¼ teaspoon ground cayenne pepper

4 kaiser rolls, split
Thinly sliced red onion

2 tablespoons mayonaise
2 heaping teaspoons fresh mint sauce

Served with lettuce and red onion – and any salad on the side you might desire.

Grill with crumbled feta on top.

Pairs well with a robust Red wine.

Comment [1]

Dinner hour - Bucatini All'Amatriciana · 31.05.15 by colin newell

Bucatini Alla Matriciana

This is one of my wife’s favourite meals at a local restaurant named Zambri’s – using our own tomatoes from the garden as well as many other fresh ingredients, we created the Marinara (which is basically Tomatoes, onions, finely diced celery, carrots, 1/2 cup of red wine, garlic etc – full recipe to follow). The Marinara is the foundation for many classic Italian recipes and we will give it its own blog entry shortly!

1/8 cup extra virgin olive oil
5 oz. thinly sliced pancetta (or bacon)
1/2 red onion – cut lengthwise in half – and 1/4” half moons
2 teaspoons mince garlic
1 heaping teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 cups home made marinara sauce
freshly grated pecorino romano cheese
2 servings Bucatini pasta

Put water on to boil with salt
Meanwhile in a saute pan combine olive oil, pancetta, onion, garlic and red pepper flakes.
Cook over medium low until the onion is softened and the pancetta has rendered much of its fat – about 12 to 15 minutes.

Drain away all but 1/4 cup of the fat from the pan.
Add the marinara sauce.
Turn up the heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer.
Allow to simmer for 6 – 7 minutes.

While the sauce is simmering, cook the Bucatini in boiling water for about 12 minutes or as directed by pasta cooking instructions – looking for “very firm” – drain.
Add the pasta to the simmering sauce and toss for about 1 minute to coat.

Divide the pasta among the plates (two servings) dress with grated cheese.


House Guest - A left coast road trip. · 13.04.15 by colin newell

Chef Lisa from SoBo

Celebrated Tofino Chef Lisa Ahier brings her SoBo Cookbook to Spinnakers to launch new Victoria dinner series; Houseguest. a​nd E​AT Magazine present a three part dinner series and industry outreach program featuring edible highlights from Tofino, Portland and Vancouver at a rotating host of local venues in an exciting pop-up format on the third Sunday of each month.

It started with a road trip down the coast. Then a ​scenic drive through the Pacific Northwest to enjoy the culinary highlights of a nearby city. Inspired by a warm welcome and a unique local connection with our new friends. We decided to invite them to visit us back home.

The idea was simple. Our group of industry professionals will curate a guest list of exciting talent from the west coast with presenting partner, EAT Magazine. A ​pop-up style program, serving as a catalyst for edible journeys to the coastal communities within reach of a road trip along the Left Coast.

Houseguest ​is a new series that will challenge diners to discover the hidden treasures close to home, build new creative culinary partnerships in nearby markets and showcase the quality of the burgeoning Vancouver Island culinary scene.

Read the entire media release below!



All you need is now - Living in Victoria - Beer Coffee Battle Royal · 11.04.15 by colin newell

Andrea and I spoke with Veronica, creative and business partner at the new Second Crack Coffee on Bridge Street. Between sips of excellent single origin Ethiopian coffee freshly roasted on their Deidrich Roaster and nibbles on a delicious Empire Doughnut, we talked about how Veronica, Aaron and their young one made their way to Victoria. They came via Sweden and via Thailand.

Which begs the question. Why Victoria? Why here? Why now?

Well, guess what? Victoria B.C. Canada is currently ground zero for some of the best coffee in North America, a beer culture that is burning hotter than the engines on an Atlas rocket, a level of culinary competency never seen in our city before and an environment that is 2 and 1/2 seasons long: No snow. No ice. Continuous good times. It would be inaccurate to say that Victoria never sleeps and that the fun runs 24 hours a day… because it doesn’t. It sleeps alright. Upwards of 8 – 10 hours every day… So it can give you another 14 hours of awesome.

Coffee: If you have ever read my reasonably comprehensive list on what the city has to offer in the coffee department, you will know this: We cater to all tastes. We have an inexhaustible supply of freshly roasted single origin coffees and enough espresso coffee to keep and entire city on edge. We’ve got World class baristas on top of their game. We have more cafes per capita than most North American city – slightly behind (but not far) Portland and Seattle Washington. If there is a hip method of brewing coffee in Victoria, it’s here and it’s done really, really well.

Beer: In Victoria’s burgeoning community of brew lovers, our bearded and plaid clad dudes and stylish hipster damsels are a fashion show all to themselves. And the beer itself, well it flows into this city like an effervescent torrent that quenches an ever increasing thirst for unique and classic flavours. And we love it. I have been drinking beer since 1980 and I have never seen anything like this before. It’s amazing.

Food: There is nothing you can tune in on the Food Channel or experience in any four star restaurant in New York or Paris that you cannot get on some level here. Sure, Victoria food culture is something of an amalgam of styles – and there is nothing that is definitively “here” – But… we do a lot of styles really well. With the rise of awareness of sustainability and the 100 mile menu, we are seeing more fresh food, more authentic slow food being done really, really, really well. It’s exciting. It’s engaging and there is enough World quality food to keep you busy for months on end.

So. If you ever wonder why anyone would make their way from the four corners of the globe to come here, it is because it is great. So, if you live here, take a look around in the here and the now. Find your moment. This place is glorious and is totally “now”. Get into it. Check it out. It’s red hot and getting hotter.

All you need is now.

Colin is a Victoria resident and coffee culture writer. Always looking for the best cups and the best plates, Colin checks out them all – so you won’t be disappointed.


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