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Good Eats - Masala Lamb meatballs. · 17 February 2015 by colin newell

Masala lamb HOT - from EAT Magazine

We shared a 1/2 lamb with my sister and brother-in-law – and with that package came from great ground lamb. This was the perfect recipe for lamb. This is a fascinating mixture of spice with an intriguing Mediterranean flavour and a nice bite. This recipe was inspired from the latest issue of EAT Magazine in Victoria B.C. Canada – but we mixed it up just a little bit. You can serve it with polenta, rice or pasta. We chose pasta. Overall, it takes about an hour to prepare so make sure you have a glass of red wine in your hand while you work!

SAUCE -
3 Garlic Cloves chopped
1 Onion chopped
1 Tablespoon fresh grated ginger
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 Tablespoon Cumin seeds
28 ounce canned plum tomatoes
1 tablespoon garam masala
1 teaspoon tumeric
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon sea salt

MEATBALLS -

2 green onions shopped
2 eggs
1 slice brown bread
1/4 table cream
2 pounds ground lamb
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

TOPPING
Feta cheese.

PART ONE:

In a food processor, puree 3 garlic cloves with one chopped medium onion and
1 teaspoon fresh minced ginger.

Heat 1/4 cup oil in Dutch oven on medium heat.
Add 1 tablespoon cumin seeds and heat until they start to sizzle. Then add onion/garlic mixture.

Stir often until mixture softens and is translucent. Reduce heat to medium-low to prevent browning.
Cook 8 – 10 minutes.

PART TWO:

Puree canned plum tomatoes with 1 tablespoon garam masala and 1 teaspoon ea. Turmeric, Cayenne and Salt. Pour into pan with Onion and Garlic mixture. Stir in one cup water. Simmer 20 minutes to blend flavour.

PART THREE:

For the meatballs, in a food processor puree two chopped green onions with two eggs, one slice of brown bread torn into pieces and 1/4 cup table cream.
Turn this mix into a large bowl – add 2 pounds of ground lamb. 1 teaspoon fennel seeds, ground cumin and cinnamon. Add a pinch of salt. Gently mix until blended. Then shape into balls. Aim for a chubby golf ball size.

Makes about 20 meatballs.

PART FOUR:

Bake meatballs on baking (cookie sheet) brushed with oil. Broil until brown (6 – 8 minutes)
Then reduce heat to 375.

PART FIVE:

Add meatballs to sauce in Dutch oven. Cover and bake until sauce is bubbly and meat balls are cooked through. 10 – 15 minutes.

Finish with fresh mint and crumbled feta cheese.

We served over Penne pasta. Serves 4 – 6.

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Thai coconut Turkey soup - it's spicy · 27 October 2014 by colin newell

Thai Turkey Soup

It is a cool October evening and what better way of heating it up a notch than with some Thai turkey soup.

Granted this is a variation on the old classic Chicken soup… but it prepares well and is mighty spicy.

Strap yourself in.

The basics

2 teaspoons canola oil
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper
4 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 (3-inch) stalk lemongrass, halved lengthwise
2 teaspoons sambal oelek (ground fresh chile paste)
3 cups Turkey stock
1 1/4 cups coconut milk
4 teaspoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
2 cups shredded cooked Turkey breast (about 8-12 ounces)
1/2 cup green onion strips
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

Preparation

1. Heat a stock pot over medium heat. Add oil to pan.
2. Add mushrooms, red bell pepper, peeled ginger, garlic and lemon grass – stir constantly for 3 minutes or so.
3. Add chile paste; stir for another minute.
4. Add Turkey Stock, coconut milk, fish sauce, and sugar;

5. Ease to a simmer.

6. Reduce heat to low; simmer for 10 minutes. Add turkey to pan

7.) Simmer for a few minutes. Discard lemongrass. Top with onions, cilantro, and lime juice.
Serve with bread.

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French toast in the comfort of your country kitchen · 26 October 2014 by colin newell

French Toast at home - better than ever

I have this thing… about French toast… and I am not even French.

I have searched nation wide and out into the Pacific for the perfect serving of French toast – and I have found it in places like Hawaii, on the Big Island… like the Holualoa Cafe .

But here in Victoria? Not so much. There are promises of a great French toast. Hints of a French toast. I have been promised French toast, but the truth is, it is rarely delivered. I feel that on some menus here in the city, that they should have a French toast offered at one price… as is… and $5 more for French toast prepared lovingly or with a little passion. Because that is what it takes. It’s not rocket science but you need to pay attention to get this item right.

Normally what I get around town is French toast prepared by people clearly angry with the French people for some inexplicable reason. I don’t get it.
All I want is French toast prepared well and tasting like it should; fluffy like a cumulus cloud or a souffle and not drier and chewier than the soles of an army boot.

So here is Andrea’s and my home country kitchen French toast recipe.

Buy one loaf of braided egg bread or a loaf of Challah bread from your local bakery.
It should be bread on the white side – fluffy and fresh to begin with with enough density to absorb the egg batter thoroughly.

Anyway – here goes…

Mix together your egg mixture which consists of:

2 Eggs
2/3 Cup milk (which would be a blend of 1/4 cup half-half and the rest skim)
pinch of salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons vanilla

Put a frying pan onto medium-high heat.

Pour your egg mixture into a shallow pan (like a lasagna pan…)
Take 6 thickly sliced pieces of the bread and place them in the egg mixture – for 10 minutes soaking on each side… that is 20 minutes of soaking!

Put a large dollop of butter into the hot frying – about a tablespoon (heaping)

Put three of the soaked slices of bread into the pan.
Cover loosely with a lid that is slightly ajar – and cook for around 2 minutes each side… until each side is golden brown.

Note: Using a pan cover helps keep the toast from being undercooked or soggy in the middle.

Served with butter, maple syrup, Hawaiian coconut syrup, fresh fruit or sauteed apples in simple syrup – only limited by your imagination!

Oh yes. This toast goes great with a darn fine cup of hot black coffee!


8 years ago I wrote this blog about dairy free waffles. It turned out to be the most popular blog entry here. You can find that recipe over here – enjoy.

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Cuban influenced BBQ Rotisserie Chicken · 3 September 2014 by colin newell

Dry Brined Cuban Chicken - from the good people at Weber BBQ

My wife’s gal-pal Sheila A. got us a Weber Rotisserie attachment as a house warming gift.

A suitable grilling recipe seemed in order — and to have her over to treat her to the dish.

So off to the Weber recipe guide – which is very expansive. Original link here

The Dry Brine

Finely grated zest of 2 large oranges (around 3 tablespoons of zest)
1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
2½ teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon Old Bay® Seasoning

1 whole free-range chicken, about 4 pounds, neck, giblets, wing tips, and excess fat removed
Extra-virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

In a small bowl combine the dry brine ingredients. Pat the chicken dry with paper towels. Brush the chicken all over with olive oil and season evenly, inside and outside, with the dry brine.
Refrigerate, uncovered, for 24 to 36 hours.

Next day – Rinse the chicken briefly under cold running water to remove most of the dry brine.
Pat the chicken dry with paper towels and season with the pepper.

Prepare your grill for indirect cooking over medium heat (350° to 450°F).

Truss the chicken: Slide a four-foot length of butcher’s twine under the legs and back. Lift both ends of the twine and cross them between the legs. Then run one end under one drumstick. Run the other end under the other drumstick and pull both ends to draw the drumsticks together. Bring the twine along both sides of the chicken so that it holds the legs and wings against the body.
Tie a knot in the ends between the neck and the top of the breast. If necessary, push the breast down a little to expose more of the neck.

Following the grill’s instructions, secure the chicken in the middle of a rotisserie spit, put the spit in place, and turn on the motor.

Place a large disposable foil pan underneath the chicken to catch the drippings.

Cook the chicken over indirect medium heat, with the lid closed, until the surface is a deep golden brown and the internal temperature reaches 160° to 165°F in the thickest part of the thigh (not touching the bone), abut 1¼ to 1½ hours. Make sure you use a digital thermometer – and make sure you achieve these internal temperatures! Food safety!

When the chicken is fully cooked, turn off the rotisserie motor and remove the spit from the grill.
Tilt the chicken upright over the foil pan so that the liquid that has accumulated in the chicken’s cavity pours into the pan. Transfer the chicken to a platter and tent loosely with aluminum foil. Let rest for 5 to 10 minutes (the internal temperature will rise 5 to 10 degrees during this time).

The chicken was melt-in-your-mouth tender, juicy and gently fragrant with the sublime influence of the spice rub and brine. We served this wonderful chicken dish with pasta salad and BBQ corn on the cob (about 10 minutes on the grill while the chicken rested) – apply a garlic butter mix to the cobs while turning every two minutes. Serve with the beverage of your choice; beer, wine, fruit juice, tropical cocktails, or whatever you like.

And Enjoy! This chicken could have easily served 6 – 8 people with various sides.

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Coming to Cobble Hill - Amazing Pizza - chef and name sought · 24 March 2014 by colin newell

Cobble Hill Pizza place seeks Pizza chef

Who doesn’t love a good pizza place in the neighborhood? You know the kind of home grown, mom and pop operation that makes their dough in house from genuine Italian pizza flour…
and bakes the pizza in a 500-650 degree oven… in and out of the oven in 3 minutes or less.

To be savored in a comfortable pizzeria or taken home to enjoy…

Where the pizza recipes are not your standard multiple toppings, but healthy and fresh ingredients from a menu designed by an actual award winning chef and food expert?

Well, there is one such place only weeks from opening on the Cowichan Bay turn-off on the Island Highway – in the Valley View Mall – where the Country Grocer and Drumroaster Coffee are located…

They need two things:

They need a name.
And they need a Pizza chef!

The name needs to be short, catchy and original – and they are putting out a little contest to reward the person that comes up with a name that sticks.
And they need a passionate and motivated self-starter Pizza chef that is going to love the rural life in the Cowichan Valley as well as the upscale vibe of this new pizza joint.

Jump in with your ideas in the comment field or send me a note!

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Book release - Deerholme Farm Foraging. · 14 March 2014 by colin newell

Deerholme Foraging Book release

The Deerholme Foraging Book

We are pleased to announce the publication of Bill’s new cookbook The Deerholme Foraging Book. It is an exploration of the wild foods of the Pacific Northwest and includes products from the forests, fields and ocean shores of the region. The book brings you into the world of the forager, drawing on 10,000 years of experience that have allowed us to evolve from the foraging society we once all belonged to.

These ancient lessons are modernized to create delicious recipes and allow you to build a knowledge base, create items for the pantry and to capitalize on the delicious and health promoting foods from the wild.

From the back cover:

Open your door to the wild foods of the Pacific Northwest with the Deerholme Foraging Book. In this comprehensive cookbook, award winning writer, chef and experienced forager Bill Jones shares his foraging tips and more than 110 unique and delicious recipes, each featuring a type of wild food. Global in influence, these recipes use simple techniques woven in with expert processes to create good, homemade food.

Learn to identify, source, and preserve local mushrooms, edible plants, sea vegetables, and shellfish. And gain knowledge of the traditional uses for wild foods as well as future possibilities for a healthy diet, while enhancing your appreciation for the natural environment. In The Deerholme Foraaging Book, food lovers will experience the joy of uncovering the bounty of the wild.

Excerpt from the Introduction:

“How can foraging help? First of all foraging is about acquiring and using knowledge. Secondly, it is all about respect. Acquiring this knowledge may empower you to look at your world with a more questioning glance. Who made up the rule that all safe food must be grown in industrial controlled production? When did we decide if you pay nothing for an item it is worthless? Why are we obsessed with controlling nature? You may end up seeing the world as more than black and white—it may be tinged with seaweed green and chanterelle yellow.”

Advance Praise for The Deerholme Foraging Book:

It’s rare to find an expert forager who is also an inspired chef. But from Weed Pie to Smoked Salmon with Honey and Grand Fir, Bill Jones reveals a trove of wild delights with recipes easy enough to whip up at home but that would also dazzle if served at a great restaurant.
—Ron Zimmerman, Proprietor, The Herbfarm Restaurant

I have seldom felt more connected to food, than foraging the Cowichan Valley with Bill. A meal he made ranks as one of my most memorable, foraged food prepared with skill and creativity. This book will inspire you to get off the couch and jump into the forest.
—Rob Clark, Chef/Owner of The Fish Counter

Bill Jones is THE authority on foraging and mushrooms in British Columbia. Deerholme Farm is a mecca for culinarians who love the outdoors and Bill captures the beauty and essence of the Vancouver Island wilderness in his recipes and writing. A must have book for anyone who delves into the wild!
—Eric Pateman, Chef/Owner of Edible Canada

Bill Jones is one of those rare chef-foragers who combines the skills of an excellent chef and teacher with an extensive expertise in the foods of field and forest. This is an exceptional combination and that is why you must add this book to your library.
—Dr. Sinclair Philip, Co-Owner of Sooke Harbour House

About Deerholme Farm

Deerholme Farm is a culinary destination in the Cowichan Valley of Vancouver Island. We offer local food experiences that introduce you to the wild and untamed side of Vancouver Island’s food system.

We are famous for our unique and often spectacular local food events based on seasonal themes and local foraged foods. Our work has been profiled in the New York Times, Bon Appetite, Saveur, Travel and Leisure, Harrowsmith, the Globe and Mail and many prominent publications.

We host guests from all over the world, so be sure to book in advance if you would like to join us for a delightful evening of Cowichan Valley cuisine. We live in one of the more amazing places on the planet, where climate, geography and community come together in a unique and delicious way. Please visit us on the web or through social media. You can contact Bill directly:

4830 Stelfox Rd
Duncan, BC
V9L 6S9

tel: 250.748.7450

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